Friday, June 29, 2018

OH! DEAR! MY DEAR! MY MIND IS UNCLEAR!






I know I’m not the only person who has been caught in “that” moment.  Come on...’fess up!   You have, too.   Over the years, I have...often. 

The moment when you feel like the legendary deer we often hear about...the one that keeps getting caught in the headlights; except, in the instances to which I am referring, the lights just won’t come on - not even a slightest flicker.

Switching to LED bulbs won’t help, either.  Nothing will...except being able to disappear on the spot – “Whooosh!”

Giving no warning, your mind goes on strike, refusing to work.  No incentives or threats will kick its cogs into gear.  Intimidation is useless.  It won’t work.  If you could, you’d pack up your tools, go home and hide, never to resurface; but you can’t.  There’s no hiding place; no escape hatch.   

Face it!  You are caught...trapped!

Of course you, like I, have experienced the excruciating occasions when your mind goes blank...giving you nothing – nada - zilch – zero – naught – nix - zippo - zip!

It’s pointless shaking your head in an effort to wake up your brain.  Take my word – doing so doesn’t work – and, to the person with whom you are speaking, you look like a bit of an idiot. (Probably confirming what they’ve always thought about you).  I speak from experience.  

Beating your head against the nearest wall will only attract those fellows with the van and the white jackets – so give that idea a miss.  (I’m not speaking from experience in my latter statement...but I imagine it is what would happen).  If you try this method, make sure you do it when no one else is around to see you.

Standing in front of you, oblivious of your state of panic...unaware of the embarrassment you’re feeling...is someone you know quite well; someone you even socialised with at various occasions.  

Making matters worse, adding to your terror, sometimes it could even be a close acquaintance. 

Try as you may, you can’t remember the person’s name!

Innocently ignorant of your discomfort, the suddenly nameless person standing before you continues happily chatting away, while you continue squirming.   

Meanwhile, your face, which feels like it’s growing redder by the second, and your smile has become fixed as if it’s stuck there by Super Glue.  

Kidding yourself, you think if you keep smiling - keep agreeing with what is being said - enlightenment will come.  It doesn’t.  The minutes feel like hours...weeks.

It is during those agonising, tortuous, humiliating episodes when “my dear”, “dear”, “mate”, “love”, and if push comes to shove, “lovey”, come in handy.
 
Time, showing no mercy, forges forth.  Hapless and helpless, you’re now in the position where you can’t ask the person his/her name because you’ve known him/her for ages and, as I’ve touched on previously, on occasions, you’ve mingled and conversed during social gatherings.

You have no excuses to offer.  In truth, there are none.  Offering any makes matters worse.  You went to sleep early the previous night, so you can’t blame your denseness on a late night. 

If you try to excuse your bumbling, vacant behaviour, you end up embarrassing yourself even further.  It’s best to shut up. 

And, then, when the person with whom you’re conversing is talking as if he/she loves the sound of his/her own voice (in lots of instances, many do.  I know a couple – one, in particular, who I’m always dodging), at appropriate intervals mumble a muffled “my dear”, or any of the other suggestions I’ve mentioned above. 

If you’re wearing a watch, even if you’re not, pretend you are, and gasp:– “Wow!  Is that the time?  I must be off!  It’s been great chatting with you, my dear.  Let’s catch up again soon!”  Hoping against hope, you don’t!  At least, not until you remember the person’s name.  

Don’t use my ex-husband’s method, though.  He was keen on word-association.  One day, after a couple of weeks of practice,  he put word-association into use with a new client who was visiting from out of town, with the purpose of purchasing property in the city – in the inner-city suburb of Toowong or its nearby surrounds.  

On the day of their first face to face meeting, the new client, “Mr. Trigger”, became “Mr. Gun”, much to my ex’s immediate embarrassment.  Shooting from the lip, word-association triggered the incorrect name for my ex, Randall, in that instance.

Fortunately, Mr. Rifle...oops....Mr. Trigger...had a sense of humour.  They both laughed at the slip of the tongue.  Their light-hearted meeting sparked off a fruitful business relationship. A couple of properties were purchased, which, down the line, generated more business between the two.   

Randall was a gun real estate salesman/agent....and, yes....I remember his name, without word-association or prompting!

Rosemary Chickpea Soup: Pour 1c of vegetable broth into blender with 1/2c sun-dried tomatoes, 1tbs minced garlic and 1/2tsp chilli flakes; blast on high 30-60 secs, until smooth. Set aside.  In a large pot, heat 1tsp x-virgin oil over med-heat; sauté 1/2c diced onion, 1/4tsp salt and 1tbs minced garlic for 5mins, until soft and translucent. Add 1 can un-drained, crushed tomatoes, 1tbs finely chopped fresh rosemary, and 1/2tsp finely chopped thyme; sauté until fragrant. Add the blended mixture, 4 cups vegie broth, and 1/2tsp salt. Increase heat to high; bring to boil. Reduce heat to med-low, add 3c cooked or canned (drained) chickpeas. Simmer, partially covered, for about 10mins. Stir in 1-1/2c shredded spinach/kale or silverbeet. Sprinkle over finely-sliced green part of shallots just before serving.

Super Patties: Finely chop 227g tempeh; add 28g diced onion, 2tbs crushed garlic, 1tsp brown sugar, 1/2tsp salt, 1tsp ground black pepper, 1-1/2tsp each dried sage, thyme and smoked paprika, 2tbs chopped fresh rosemary, 1/8tsp nutmeg, 1/4tsp cayenne, 1/4tsp chilli flakes, 2tbs Worcestershire sauce and 1tbs olive oil; mix by hand or pulse in processor, until thoroughly combined. Adjust seasoning, if necessary. Chill overnight.  Form into flat patties, ½-inch thick.  Heat a little oil in pan over med-heat. Cook patties 3-4mins until browned; gently flip; cook 3-4mins.

Braised Red Cabbage: Finely dice 1 onion; add it to a large pot along with 2tbs butter. Sauté over med-low heat until onion is soft and transparent.  Finely shred enough red cabbage to make 6-8 cups; thinly slice 1 Granny Smith apple. Add cabbage, apple, 1/4c cider vinegar, /4c water and 1/2tp salt to pot. Over med-heat, cover pot; let cabbage cook, stirring occasionally, until very tender (20-30mins). If bottom of pot begins to dry, add 1/4c water. Season with freshly cracked pepper, or more salt or vinegar, if desired. 

36 comments:

  1. That's right. It happens to almost anyone to get stuck in this embarrassing situation of forgetfullness - and there seems to be no escape.
    The patties are one of my favorite dishes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey DUTA....Those foggy moments arrived without warning and are not welcome! lol

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  2. Oh, the dread of forgetting someone's name! It's awful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is is, messymimi...that it is.

      Thanks for coming by. (I hope you've noticed I remembered yours)!!! :)

      Delete
  3. Crikey Lee .... that happens to my Mum all the time. She's older than Methuselah. She also has trouble finding the right words. That's even more embarrassing. Darling, love, lovey etc. works with names but when words don't come it can be a nightmare. That red cabbage stuff sounds good. Not to me of course. I like MEAT but Mum loves cabbage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Woof! Woof! Charlie! As long as Mum doesn't forget your name...it's the most important name of all!!

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  4. Perhaps we should just all call each other darla. For some reason a workmates name would not stick in my mind. His name is Troy so with word association, I thought Helen of Troy. It worked but the inevitable happened and I called him Helen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Andrew...Yes, word-association has its dangers as I mentioned re what occurred with my ex and his client. As long as the recipient has a sense of humour...all is okay! lol

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
    2. He was young and is gay and he just rolled his eyes when stupid old Auntie explained about Helen of Troy. I doubt he had ever heard of her anyway.

      Delete
  5. I plead guilty. Embarassingly so. As I related on Andrew's blog one sad morning I failed to recognise my niece, her partner and their children. I did wonder where the skinny one knew them from. I have also forgotten the name of that niece's mother, despite her being married to my brother for over thirty years. The worst thing? I prefer her to my brother quite often, and still forgot her name.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, dear! EC...that one takes the cake!! lol

      As long as we don't forget our own self, we'll be doing okay...I hope!! I often don't recognise the face in my mirror looking back at me. I have no idea who that strange woman is who has take up abode in there!!

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  6. Goodness my mind often goes on holiday when I'm home :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mine, too, Margaret...and then returns when I decide it's time to go to sleep! :)

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  7. I recognize their face but can't remember where I know them from, then I get home and it dawns on me, ugh, very embarrassing, will have to face them next week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We're not alone, Linda...which sometimes is a good thing! :)

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  8. Re forgetting ones self - I also often wonder who the woman in the mirror is, she looks so much like my mother, yet that can't be so. Must ask her her name next time she appears lol
    So far so good on the personal name front - well sometimes I have to get The Golfer to remind me what some of his friend's partners/ wives are called but my friends have 'stuck by me' well their names have
    'Things' are a different matter though. That's when the blank face appears....we can get past it with friends by
    mentioning - 'help me out here 'senior moment' or 'sounds like'. Otherwise we end up mumbling something unintelligible.
    Take care
    Cathy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes...that's similar to my response to Elephant's Child, Cathy. I have a stranger living in my mirror, too! lol

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  9. I have a little blue Crueset pot just like that one pictured.
    As for remembering people's names, I'm way past the embarrassment stage. I straight out say I've forgotten their name and they tell me what it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, River. Le Creuset is a fabulous product. I've always been a big fan. I still have the large oval, lidded orange Dutch oven I bought back around 1972, thereabouts. I couldn't afford to buy one of similar size nowadays. I also have an oval au gratin and an oval braiser...both are orange, too. I've had them for years, as well, and would never part with them.

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  10. The blank wall happens to us all. I am finding it happening more often lately but am telling myself that it is part of anxiety and not dementia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Arleen...I think the moments we have re forgetting the names of people we're talking with at times is not an age thing...it occurs to all of us...at all ages. It's just one of those things that happens sometimes...

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  11. I just smile in a delightful old lady kind of way and say, "my goodness, I seem to be having a senior moment."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. G'day Delores...."Senior moments" have struck everyone of us even when we were classed as "seniors". :)

      Delete
  12. I have done this many, many times. And yet, I can remember social security numbers from some of my students from the past, telephone numbers from my teen years, every address where I have lived, etc.
    Even more embarrassing is when someone is with you and is waiting for an introduction to this lovely friend of yours and it never comes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here, Peace Thyme. There's no logical explanation to the illogical! lol

      Yes...that latter predicament you describe is one when you feel like running for the hills! lol

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  13. Yes, blanks get to all of us … I do as Delores (only slightly confused) does!

    Love the sound of braised red cabbage.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jan....I had a "blank" the other day. A woman I try to dodge snuck up on me as I was loading my groceries into my car....I turned around and there she was! For a couple of moments I was like that deer in the headlight...I had no escape although I wanted one! :)

      For a moment her name slipped my mind...and then, unfortunately, I asked her how she was!! I should know better! It was my own fault...the words blurted out before I had a chance to put a halt to them. I received her whole medical history, and that of her husband...up to that very minute! Oh! Dear! She always does that...with everyone....as I said...I should have known better!! :)

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  14. Ohh dear YES... I have done that big time... many, many years ago and it taught me a lesson I have never repeated!!
    There was this woman who was very well to do who was married to a pilot.. so not short of a $ or 2. We had met at a social gathering and initially all was pleasant. But then the catty side became exposed & I was getting feedback on not so generous comments. I no longer mixed in her preferred social circles but then we lived in the same area so ran into each other from time to time. If I had a chance meeting with this woman I might recount the meeting with my husband using a not so flattering name for her to the point where I could not remember her correct name - for the life of me, it was GONE! I still to this day can only remember her nick name but I would not recognise her these days anyway with many moons gone past, but never again would I be tempted to ever engage in referring to someone with an unflattering name.
    Thankyou for the lovely recipes.. I always love a good chick pea one to add to the weekly fare :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Elle B. I love your tale. A case of living dangerously, name-wise!

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  15. I've been getting that for ages but I think it might be getting worse. I have so much more knowledge in my brain now than I did before you see :) I even had to introduce someone when I couldn't remember her name, but at least my brain worked quick enough so I introduced the other person (whose name I did know, thank goodness) to the anonymous one, and shut up. Anonymous then said to him, "My name's Jane. Pleased to meet you." Phew!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the way to do it when caught in such a situation, Jenny. :) It has nothing to do with our ages...nothing to do with getting older. It's just one of those things that happen now and again...to all of us. :)

      Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  16. Each sentence was more entertaining than the last. I had to smile as I was in your place at several points in the post. Somedays I almost wear the switch out but in the long run I figure it does not matter until I see the person again. RATS. WHY? Peace

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there, Miss Kitty. It sure make life interesting! lol

      'Tis good to see you...thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  17. Those super patties sound delish.
    My mind is a card-carrying union member;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Sandra. Many minds are members of that club/union! Thanks for coming by. :)

      Delete
  18. What really caught my eye was your Rosemary Chickpea Soup recipe, this sounds absolutely delicious. I am definitely going to try this recipe out some time this week, thanks for the share. World of Animals

    ReplyDelete