Wednesday, April 22, 2015

IMAGINE….LEST WE FORGET



ANZAC DAY....25TH APRIL....100 YEARS SINCE THE LANDINGS AT GALLIPOLI COVE



 

Imagine what life would be like if, from this day forth, the world experienced something the world has never had. Often I wonder what it would be like if, from this day forth, the best thing the world has never had became ours to enjoy; ours to appreciate for ever more.....

The best thing the world has never had?  

 Peace…imagine…

On 25th April we not only honour the Anzacs who fought in the First World War at Gallipoli, but also those who faced combat on the battlefields of the Western Front in Belgium and France; and those who battled in the Middle East.

 http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/

On Anzac Day we also commemorate all our men and women of the Armed Forces, past and present who have served and are serving in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping missions overseas.  

25th April is an important day. However, it’s also important for us to every day remember and show respect to our brave Defence Force personnel who put their lives on the line to protect and conserve the freedom we experience in Australia; to preserve our National heritage.  I hope - as much as you do, I imagine - the freedom we enjoy in our wonderful country is not tenuous; that the sacrifices made by many haven’t been, and will never be in vain.

100 years have passed since the dawn landing on the beach beneath the rugged ridges of the Gallipoli Peninsula; difficult, unfriendly terrain fiercely protected by the Ottoman Army. 

More than 20,000 brave Aussies, New Zealanders and some from other countries went ashore, not knowing what horrors lay ahead.  They were met with heavy fire before their feet had time to touch the sand beneath the foreign water. 

The first Australian officer to fall that fateful morning was Captain William Annear from the 11th Battalion, Subiaco, Western Australia.  620 Aussies died the first day; 57 from the 11th Battalion. The rest of the four infantry battalions of the 3rd Brigade, First Australian Division were not left unscathed. The hostile barrage didn’t abate; nor did the iron will, the resolve of our Diggers.  

From a population of less than five million, during the First World War 62,000 Aussies were killed; 156,000 suffered injuries. 

Alex Campbell, the final surviving Aussie who participated in the Gallipoli Campaign passed away 16th May, 2002, aged 103. 

There’s no debate.  We must never forget the 416, 809 men who enlisted in the First World War; nor those in the years that have followed. Our Diggers past and present deserve our respect. 

Our brave men and women of the Armed Forces are heroes, not martyrs. 

They don’t operate from evil, hate, greed or prejudice.  They don’t trivialize life.  They are the epitome of freedom, justice, compassion, decency, courage, determination and spirit. 

Aussie men and women of our Defence Force, past, present and future - imagine how it would feel never having the need to use the word “future” again in reference to our Diggers - put their lives at risk, day after day; year after year. Their reward should be they’re able to return to their loved ones, unharmed, physically and mentally.  

If we, one and all, put our heads together and imagined a world filled with humans who would rather create than destruct; who’d rather dream than destroy; who chose love over hate; who made kindness their priority, not callous cruelty…a world filled with respect rather than disrespect; rich with liberty rather than oppression… maybe…just maybe…IMAGINE..... 




Anzac Day is a solemn, emotional day, but it can't go by without our iconic Anzac biscuits. I'm including recipes here because they are popular in Australia and New Zealand.  Anzac biscuits have long been associated with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC...established in World War 1).   During the First World War the biscuits were sent to the soldiers who were abroad by their wives, mothers, family members.  The biscuits kept well because the ingredients didn't spoil easily.  They are a tradition...many discussions are held whether Anzac biscuits should be chewy, crunchy or crisp...



Traditional Anzac Biscuits: Preheat oven to 160°C. Line 2 baking trays with non-stick baking paper. Combine 1c plain flour, 1c rolled oats, 1c desiccated coconut, 1/2c firmly packed brown sugar and 1/4c caster sugar (combined) in a large bowl. In a small saucepan put 125g butter, 2tbs golden syrup and 2tbs water; place over medium heat until butter melts and the mixture is smooth; stir in 1/2tsp bicarb soda.  Add to dry ingredients; stir until well combined. Roll level tablespoonfuls of the oat mixture into balls and place, about 5cm apart, on the prepared trays. Flatten until about 1cm thick. Bake, swapping trays halfway through cooking, for 15 minutes or until light golden. Set aside for 10 minutes to cool slightly before transferring to wire racks to cool completely.

HINTS - Make Anzac biscuits your way; 

 Soft and chewy: Omit the brown sugar and increase the caster sugar to 155g (3/4 cup).
Dark and crunchy: Omit caster sugar. Increase the brown sugar to 155g (3/4 cup, firmly packed). Bake for 18 minutes.
Thin and crispy: Omit the caster sugar. Increase the brown sugar to 200g (1 cup).  
Reduce the flour to 115g (3/4 cup).


Gluten-Sugar-Free Anzacs: Combine 1c almond meal, 1c flaked almonds, 1c desiccated coconut and 1tsp Xantham Gum. Combine 1/4c rice malt syrup and 1/4c butter in pot; heat gently; mix in 1/2tsp bicarb and 1tbs water; pour into malt/butter; mix until it starts to froth; pour into dry ingredients; mix to combine. Roll into balls; place on lined baking tray; flatten a bit; bake in 120C oven, 30mins until golden.  

Organic Anzacs: Combine sifted organic 1c wholemeal or spelt plain flour, 1c organic rolled oats, 1/2c organic coconut sugar, 1/2c organic desiccated coconut and 2tbs Chia seeds. In a bowl, combine 125g organic coconut oil (liquid form) and 1 or 2tbs rice bran syrup. Dissolve 1/2tsp bicarb in 2tbs boiling water; add to oil mix; stir into dry mix; if too crumbly, add 1tbs water; roll into balls; place on lined baking tray; flatten a bit. Bake in 175C oven, 12-15mins until golden.  




Anzac Cheesecake: Process 250g Anzac biscuits until fine crumbs; add 125g melted butter; process until combined; press into base of greased, base-lined round spring-form pan; chill 30mins. Beat 500g cream cheese, 200g sour cream, 1c caster sugar, 1/2c desiccated coconut and 1tbs golden syrup until smooth; add 3 eggs, 1 at a time, beating until all are incorporated; pour onto biscuit base; bake 1hr in 160C oven; then turn off oven. With door slightly ajar, cool in oven; then chill 3hrs or overnight.  Macadamia praline: Heat 1c sugar and 1c water over med-heat until bubbly and golden; don’t stir. When golden, add 100g chopped macadamia nuts; spread over tray; when cool break into pieces. Top cake with the praline; drizzle with a little golden syrup; serve.


33 comments:

  1. Only you could combine war memorials and cheesecake! Thank you for this post. I read a biography of our President Harding recently, and it's hard to believe WWI was that long ago. And that we've apparently learned so little since then.

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  2. Hey there RK. Yes...I agree...humans have learned nothing through the years... the killing goes on...the fighting continues. We will never learn. There is always evil...somewhere. Always those who want to destroy our freedom; our way of life...and our rights to think for ourselves.

    Anzac Day here has to be accompanied by our Anzac biscuits. I'll be making some tomorrow....traditions....some are difficult to break. Perhaps I could start a new one with the cheesecake...it does sound quite delicious! :)

    Thanks for popping in. :)

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  3. Oh Yum ~ that ANZAC Cheesecake sounds delish ~ another one for my cookbook. If I was more organised I could have made it for morning tea tomorrow. Perhaps next year. Knew you would write something Lee, when I was tossing around ideas last night.

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  4. Hey there Carol....Anzac Day is too important a day for us, isn't it, not to make mention. I'm not a religious person...to me Anzac Day is the most solemn day of the year. It's just how I am.

    I think I might have to make that cheesecake one of these days, too...it does sound delicious. I've never made it, but I have made the baked cheesecakes and I love them.

    Thanks for coming by. :)

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  5. War is constant and not something I will ever understand.

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    1. Hi Arleen...none of us, I'm sure...not those with whom you and I relate, anyway...will understand war. We will never understand human behaviour...but there it is...humans never learn from past mistakes. How I wish they did. How I wish evil didn't exist...but it does, unfortunately and sadly.

      Thanks for coming by. :)

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  6. Soft and Chewy: take them out of the oven just before the "golden" stage.
    Dark and Crunchy: leave them in the oven until browned just past the "golden" stage.
    Thin and Crisp: flatten them more than usual, bake until browned.

    No need to fudge around with different ingredients/sugars.

    My recipe has two tablespoons golden syrup and one teaspoon carb soda.

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    1. River, I've been making Anzac biscuits...the old, tried and true method since I was a kid - a long time ago; and I used to make them by the truckload in my shop and also when I was a chef and also at the resorts I managed. I gave the different methods above to give people various choices. Most Northern Hemisphere readers aren't familiar with our wonderful old biscuit...or cookie as they would call them in the US. Nothing like a little variety in information to keep it interesting! :)

      The central theme of my post is more important than the recipes, I believe.

      Thanks for coming by. :)

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    2. I knew that, I was just being a smarty-pants. :)

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    3. That's okay, River...you're allowed to be. :)

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  7. what a comprehensive post I am learning all about your country's history and then there are your scrumptious recipes to go with, what a treat. Now for the cheesecake that is a big downfall with me, I love it, one of these days I'll set aside some time to make one. As for peace adult humans are a bit like small children they fight over so many things, land, freedom, religion, not sure it will ever end; if only we all could live and let live, but when backed into a corner one must fight to protect themselves and when other's are killed for no reason, then those who can help must. What can we do.

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    1. History continues to repeat itself, Linda...and I can see no end to the atrocities that go on and have gone on in our world. Hate and envy....roots of all evil.

      Good must never succumb to evil...and if we have to fight to destroy evil; to retain our rights, our freedom...that's how it has to be. I know I won't ever back down. I'm glad I live in a democratic society and I'll always be proud of those who fought.for and are fighting for the rights I enjoy.

      That cheesecake is tempting, I agree! Thanks for coming in. :)

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  8. Replies
    1. Thank you, Jerry. Anzac Day means a lot to me; it always has done so.

      Thanks for coming by. Take care. :)

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  9. It is so funny because I have never heard of that history at all. Here we are good friends - connected by the internet - and yet our lives and histories are so completely different! I enjoyed it.

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  10. G'day Sandie. Gallipoli and our Anzacs is embedded in our Aussies souls; and in the souls of our Kiwi mates (New Zealanders), Sandie...a very important part of our history.

    It's an emotional time....and there are thousands of Australians and New Zealanders over in Turkey, at Gallipoli at this time...there to remember those who fought; those who fell; and those who returned to their loved ones. Thousands will also be attending Dawn Services in Villers-Bretonneux, Pozieres and Frommelles....and elsewhere in the areas classed as "The Western Front".

    Thanks for popping in. :)

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  11. The local regiment served alongside Aussies at Gallipoli at one point. They got on very well with them.

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  12. G'day, Adullamite...the Aussie troops have always had a pretty good reputation of getting along well with their allies. So many young men enlisted in the First Word War; many thinking it was going to be a grand adventure; and so many lost their lives or came back wounded, physically and mentally. So very sad...all conflicts are.

    Thanks for popping in. :)

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  13. I'm an American who has mixed feelings about the military. Certainly, we need them and should appreciate them. On the other hand, they go to fight whenever and wherever they're told to fight regardless of the right or wrong of the situation. Since I was born in 1949, my country hasn't been in a war that did any good and couldn't have easily been avoided, yet in every one of them, the military fought without questioning.

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    1. And, yet, you enjoyed the fruits of free speech, of a free, democratic society. None amongst us (of the people I relate to, anyway) enjoy war. None amongst us like the fact that we humans are at war constantly...I don't...of course, I don't.

      However, I do respect our men and women who put their lives on the line. I was born in 1944, Snowbrush...the 11th hour of the 11th month...11th November...aka Armistice Day aka Remembrance Day, coincidentally. I would rather have our Defence Force than not have it. I would rather live my life in a free society; in a democratic county like Australia, the country I call home, than not.

      I don't have mixed feelings about our Aussie Defence Force...in no way.

      Nice to meet you...thanks for popping in. :)



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  14. I am just so over the media hog-fest over ANZAC. Probably not a popular stand but, please, make it stop.

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  15. I'm pleased to see you, Cosmo...but I can't and do not agree with you on this. And I won't say "sorry" for not agreeing with your comment...because I give no apology for not being in agreement with your sentiments.

    There is such a thing as a "mute" button; or the simple ability to change channels...

    Lest We Forget.....and I hope none of us ever do.

    Take care...I hope all is well with you. :)

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  16. I guess today' s coverage has really given you the shits, then, Cosmo!

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  17. I agree with you, Lee - it's always good to honor our warriors, whether we agree with the war in question or not.

    Love your recipes and how you always tie them in. :)

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  18. Hi there Lynn...Yep...no decent-minded person likes war, but unfortunately it's the world we live in...and it's been this way since time began. Man cannot live in harmony with his fellowman. (I make no apology to the feminists or the politically-correct brigade for my umbrella statement....the word "man" is all-encompassing).

    We must honour those who face adversity on our behalf. I will never begrudge them that.

    Thanks for coming by...tell me when you make that cheesecake so I can pop in for morning tea! :)

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  19. Regarding the dream of world peace, a little known English songwriter got there before you Lee in his song, "Imagine". I doubt that you will have heard of him - John Winston Lennon, himself gunned down in New York City in December 1980:-
    Imagine there's no countries
    It isn't hard to do
    Nothing to kill or die for
    And no religion, too

    NB "...some from other countries went ashore" - 21,255 British and Irish men fell at Gallipoli. 8709 Australians. 2779 New Zealanders but by far the biggest loss of life was amongst the Turks - 86,692 died and a further 164,617 were wounded. Imagine.

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    1. Yorky...imagine if I didn't know that....just imagine....

      My post was written in tribute to our Anzacs who landed at Gallipoli on 25th April, 1915. (ANZAC - Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, which was established in World War l).

      We here in Australia and in New Zealand) commemorate on 25th April each year...Anzac Day. It's a most revered and important day in our Australian calendar...as I'm sure you already know. Your figures are incorrect.

      "Churchill initially called upon some 21 000 Australian troops who were from the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) and 10 000 New Zealand troops, who had been combined in 1914 and who were training in Egypt. These soldiers came to be known as the ANZACs (an acronym for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps). After their first day, the men had suffered 2300 casualties and had covered only 900 metres. Despite this, the soldiers obeyed orders and held their ground.

      Aside from the ANZACs, the British 29th Division and a French Army Corps were the other two main landing forces to go to Gallipoli.

      Even before the actual landing disaster struck and the campaign did not proceed as proposed. In the previous month there had been another failed attempt by French and British forces to penetrate the Dardanelles. This failure prompted the decision to make a land attack.

      Without a single loss of life, the evacuation that occurred in December, 1915 was undoubtedly the most successful part of the Gallipoli Campaign.

      It was, however, too late for many. Just over 10 000 ANZACs were killed and 33 500 injured, not to mention the thousands of other soldiers from the British Empire and her opponents."

      Of the 60,000 Australians that fought at Gallipoli, there were 26,000 casualties and 7,594 were killed. Later battles like the one at Lone Pine would see the Australians suffer, but also inflict, terrible casualties on the Turkish troops: by the end of the campaign their dead would number more than 85,000.

      Although these casualty figures were eclipsed by the campaigns on the Western Front, Australia's first encounter of the war would fix Gallipoli in the minds of the Australian people. For the volunteers who survived, the gloss of adventure had come off war and soldiering. "

      My response is almost as long as my original post. If I'd referred to the whole history of the First World War and to all of those who participated in it, both would be even much longer, I imagine.

      Thanks for coming by. :)

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    2. Lee - Sorry if my figures were incorrect I took them from an official NZ government site.

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    3. No problem, Yorky. :)

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  20. Wow this is deep. The undying issue of striving for world peace. I do still hope to see it in this lifetime.

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    1. Don't hold your breath Lux...sadly and unfortunately, humans have proven time and time again, that they are incapable of living in peace.

      Thanks for dropping in. :)

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  21. Make cheesecake, not war! And biscuits! And love too!

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  22. Dexter, I agree wholeheartedly with you...what a wonderful world it would be if we just concentrated on that. :)

    Thanks for coming by. I'll have a slice of cheesecake for you. :)

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